October Bloom Day

Well, it’s fall now, and this will likely be my last bloom day until next April or May.  Our temperatures since 15 Sept until today have ranged from highs of 52F to 87F (average of  69F over the 31 days) — which is an average of 3.9F warmer per day than the historical average (7 days totalled 43 degrees cooler than average and 20 days totalled 120 degrees warmer than average; 4 days were the same as the average) and lows from 29F to 63F (average of 42.6F over 31 days). We’re having woodstove fires fairly often now and the sunroom is not as inviting, certainly not for the cat, on most days. But it’s pleasant for outdoor chores and clean-up.

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Here are some blooms in my early October garden:

Pink Asters (variety/species unknown).

They attracted a rare butterfly to the yard, the Milbert’s Tortoiseshell (Aglais milberti):

MilbertsTortoiseshellAglaisMilbertiorangebrownbluebutterflypinkasterssideyardb9Oct2019

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ASTER laevis ‘Bluebird’ beloved of butterflies and bumblebees alike. (The last butterflies are taking their last sips.)

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HYDRANGEA (PeeGee), hanging on and in fact beautifying as it fades to dusky rose.

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PHLOX. Only a few still blooming but they want their moment of fame.

purplephloxrockwall14Oct2019MaryAnneswhitephloxbackborder13Oct2019

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The HELENIUM autumnale (sneezeweed), a rebloomer from a 2017 Botanical Interests’ “Bring Home the Butterflies” seed mix, is going strong in the peach guild despite the frosts.

sneezeweedHeleniumAutumnaleBringHomeButterfliesmixfruitguildmessy13Oct2019

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CHELONE lyonii ‘Hot Lips’ is another deep pink October bloom, along with the pink aster, the hydrangea, the Autumn Fire/Joy sedums, and the Joe Pye weed seedheads.

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Continuing with pink, here are an Autumn Fire SEDUM, a volunteer COSMOS, a bi-toned pink DIANTHUS, a BORAGE on the pinker rather than bluer side, and a small perennial CHRYSANTHEMUM flowering right through the first frosts.

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Two reddish annuals survived the first frosts as well, though the LARGE FIRECRACKER PLANT (Cuphea ‘Vermillionare’) only barely.

Firecrackervermillionairehalfaliveafterfrostflowers8Oct2019

I was surprised to see the red-flowered PINEAPPLE SAGE (Salvia elegans) make it through, as heavenly scented as always. redpineapplesageannualAutumnFiresedumafterfrost12Oct2019

The annual white and purple AFRICAN DAISIES (Osteospermum) are handling the chill like champs.

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Finally, two purple bloomers, a LAVENDER and a CENTAUREA, both reblooming.

lavenderstemraindropssunroomborder2Oct2019bluecentaurearebloomfrontyard9Oct2019

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I know it’s not a flower but the aging leaves of this giant HOSTA (variety unknown) are as eye-catching right now as anything in the garden.

largehostayellowfloppyleavesshadegarden13Oct2019

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See you in the Spring! Meanwhile, I’ll be bathing my eyes in the blooms of bloggers in the warmer climes.

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“The boy always felt October as a twilight month. Its whole function was the preparation for winter, a getting ready, a drawing-in of the sun like a snail into its shell, a shortening and tightening against the long cold.“ – Wallace Stegner, from “In the Twilight”

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

4 comments

  1. A beautiful post. It is always wonderful to photograph one’s beautiful flowers before cold weather takes them away. Have had a few wood fires of late and there is a nip in the air on many mornings. Such a beautiful time of the year.

  2. the hosta does look like a giant flower!

    On Tue, Oct 15, 2019 at 11:23 PM A Moveable Garden wrote:

    > mmwm posted: “Well, it’s fall now, and this will likely be my last bloom > day until next April or May. Our temperatures since 15 Sept until today > have ranged from highs of 52F to 87F (average of 69F over the 31 days) — > which is an average of 3.9F warmer per day than ” >

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